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Archive: chapters and lectures

GENERAL PRACTICE - A FORCE FOR CHANGE

1993 Andrew Willis  Chapter 10, The New Face of the NHS. Ed Peter Spurgeon. Longman.

 

There is nothing like being asked to give a presentation or write a chapter for a book, to force you to get your thoughts in order.

 

This is actually the 2nd edition of this chapter; the original was published a few years earlier. Unfortunately - like so many books, including both editions of this one - it is now out of print and my copy of the 1st edition was never returned from a loan.

 

General Practice- A force for change

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THE CARL MOORE ANNUAL LECTURE

1998  Andrew Willis McMaster University, Ontario, Canada

It was interesting to be invited to present a resume of a decade of NHS developments to an academic department of Primary Care, particularly at such a prestigious university.

 

Carl Moore Lecture

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GENERAL PRACTICE: NATURAL BUILDING BLOCK FOR A POPULATION - FOCUSED NHS. 

1997 Andrew Willis King Edward Road Surgery, Northampton

This was a draft chapter for a book and considered the further development of the NHS as a population - focused service that would be consistent with its fundamental principles.

 

It did so from the perspective of general practice and in ways that are compatible with the stated views of the Labour government. It considered what would help and concluded with a picture of possible ways forward.

 

General Practice: Natural building block for a population-focused NHS

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WHY GENERAL PRACTICE IS SO IMPORTANT TO THE NHS

October 2002  Pulse Medical Newspaper

This was one of the first pieces I wrote challenging the convention that hospitals come first within the NHS, and the more specialised they are the better.

 

But, given the nature of the NHS, that is nonsense.

 

Piece for Pulse Oct 2002

 

[This piece is now also included in a blog post on this site dated September 2017]

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SPECIALTY LIAISON GROUPS

Final draft for CHAPTER 10: Professional Development in General Practice. Ed. David Pendleton and John Hasler

 

SLGs were one of the greatest successes of the Northampton approach to getting GPs involved in developing local services.

Despite the focus of government policy being about the internal market, purchasing and GP fundholding, these groups were deliberately low key; they involved a couple of GPs meeting with their specialist colleagues, and working together to develop simple, common sense ways of making better use of the available resources. SLGs were just about clinicians working together, and they produced results.

Specialty Liaison Groups

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